K4JWM - Frequency List

Frequency List Links


Frequency Tables

AARL U.S. Amateur Radio Bandplan

Amateur Radio Operator License Required

160 Meters (1.8 - 2.0 MHz)

160 Meters (1.8 - 2.0 MHz)
MHz Usage
1.800 - 2.000 CW
1.800 - 1.810 Digital Modes
1.810 CW QRP
1.843 - 2.000 SSB, SSTV and other wideband modes
1.910 SSB QRP
1.995 - 2.000 Experimental
1.999 - 2.000 Beacons

80 Meters (3.5 - 4.0 MHz)

80 Meters (3.5 - 4.0 MHz)
MHz Usage
3.590 RTTY/Data DX
3.570-3.600 RTTY/Data
3.790-3.800 DX window
3.845 SSTV
3.885 AM calling frequency

40 Meters (7.0 - 7.3 MHz)

40 Meters (7.0 - 7.3 MHz)
MHz Usage
7.040 RTTY/Data DX
7.080-7.125 RTTY/Data
7.171 SSTV
7.290 AM calling frequency

30 Meters (10.1 - 10.15 MHz)

30 Meters (10.1 - 10.15 MHz)
MHz Usage
10.130-10.140 RTTY
10.140-10.150 Packet

20 Meters (14.0 - 14.35 MHz)

20 Meters (14.0 - 14.35 MHz)
MHz Usage
14.070-14.095 RTTY
14.095-14.0995 Packet
14.100 NCDXF Beacons
14.1005-14.112 Packet
14.230 SSTV
14.286 AM calling frequency

17 Meters (18.068 - 18.168 MHz)

17 Meters (18.068 - 18.168 MHz)
MHz Usage
18.100-18.105 RTTY
18.105-18.110 Packet

15 Meters (21.0 - 21.45 MHz)

15 Meters (21.0 - 21.45 MHz)
MHz Usage
21.070-21.110 RTTY/Data
21.340 SSTV

12 Meters (24.89 - 24.99 MHz)

12 Meters (24.89 - 24.99 MHz)
MHz Usage
24.920-24.925 RTTY
24.925-24.930 Packet

10 Meters (28 - 29.7 MHz)

10 Meters (28 - 29.7 MHz)
MHz Usage
28.000-28.070 CW
28.070-28.150 RTTY
28.150-28.190 CW
28.200-28.300 Beacons
28.300-29.300 Phone
28.680 SSTV
29.000-29.200 AM
29.300-29.510 Satellite Downlinks
29.520-29.590 Repeater Inputs
29.600 FM Simplex
29.610-29.700 Repeater Outputs

6 Meters (50 - 54 MHz)

6 Meters (50 - 54 MHz)
MHz Usage
50.0-50.1 CW, beacons
50.060-50.080 beacon subband
50.1-50.3 SSB, CW
50.10-50.125 DX window
50.125 SSB calling
50.3-50.6 All modes
50.6-50.8 Nonvoice communications
50.62 Digital (packet) calling
50.8-51.0 Radio remote control (20-kHz channels)
51.0-51.1 Pacific DX window
51.12-51.48 Repeater inputs (19 channels)
51.12-51.18 Digital repeater inputs
51.62-51.98 Repeater outputs (19 channels)
51.62-51.68 Digital repeater outputs
52.0-52.48 Repeater inputs (except as noted; 23 channels)
52.02, 52.04 FM simplex
52.2 TEST PAIR (input)
52.5-52.98 Repeater output (except as noted; 23 channels)
52.525 Primary FM simplex
52.54 Secondary FM simplex
52.7 TEST PAIR (output)
53.0-53.48 Repeater inputs (except as noted; 19 channels)
53.0 Remote base FM simplex
53.02 Simplex
53.1, 53.2, 53.3, 53.4 Radio remote control
53.5-53.98 Repeater outputs (except as noted; 19 channels)
53.5, 53.6, 53.7, 53.8 Radio remote control
53.52, 53.9 Simplex

2 Meters (144 - 148 MHz)

2 Meters (144 - 148 MHz)
MHz Usage
144.00-144.05 EME (CW)
144.05-144.10 General CW and weak signals
144.10-144.20 EME and weak-signal SSB
144.200 National calling frequency
144.200-144.275 General SSB operation
144.275-144.300 Propagation beacons
144.30-144.50 New OSCAR subband
144.50-144.60 Linear translator inputs
144.60-144.90 FM repeater inputs
144.90-145.10 Weak signal and FM simplex (145.01,03,05,07,09 are widely used for packet)
145.10-145.20 Linear translator outputs
145.20-145.50 FM repeater outputs
145.50-145.80 Miscellaneous and experimental modes
145.80-146.00 OSCAR subband
146.01-146.37 Repeater inputs
146.40-146.58 Simplex
146.52 National Simplex Calling Frequency
146.61-146.97 Repeater outputs
147.00-147.39 Repeater outputs
147.42-147.57 Simplex
147.60-147.99 Repeater inputs

Notes: The frequency 146.40 MHz is used in some areas as a repeater input. This band plan has been proposed by the ARRL VHF-UHF Advisory Committee.

1.25 Meters (222 - 225 MHz)

1.25 Meters (222 - 225 MHz)
MHz Usage
222.0-222.150 Weak-signal modes
222.0-222.025 EME
222.05-222.06 Propagation beacons
222.1 SSB & CW calling frequency
222.10-222.15 Weak-signal CW & SSB
222.15-222.25 Local coordinator's option; weak signal, ACSB, repeater inputs, control
222.25-223.38 FM repeater inputs only
223.40-223.52 FM simplex
223.52-223.64 Digital, packet
223.64-223.70 Links, control
223.71-223.85 Local coordinator's option; FM simplex, packet, repeater outputs
223.85-224.98 Repeater outputs only

Note: The 222 MHz band plan was adopted by the ARRL Board of Directors in July 1991.

70 Centimeters (420 - 450 MHz)

70 Centimeters (420 - 450 MHz)
MHz Usage
420.00-426.00 ATV repeater or simplex with 421.25 MHz video carrier control links and experimental
426.00-432.00 ATV simplex with 427.250-MHz video carrier frequency
432.00-432.07 EME (Earth-Moon-Earth)
432.07-432.10 Weak-signal CW
432.10 70-cm calling frequency
432.10-432.30 Mixed-mode and weak-signal work
432.30-432.40 Propagation beacons
432.40-433.00 Mixed-mode and weak-signal work
433.00-435.00 Auxiliary/repeater links
435.00-438.00 Satellite only (internationally)
438.00-444.00 ATV repeater input with 439.250-MHz video carrier frequency and repeater links
442.00-445.00 Repeater inputs and outputs (local option)
445.00-447.00 Shared by auxiliary and control links, repeaters and simplex (local option)
446.00 National simplex frequency
447.00-450.00 Repeater inputs and outputs (local option)

33 Centimeters (902 - 928 MHz)

33 Centimeters (902 - 928 MHz)
MHz Usage
902.0-903.0 Narrow-bandwidth, weak-signal communications
902.0-902.8 SSTV, FAX, ACSSB, experimental
902.1 Weak-signal calling frequency
902.8-903.0 Reserved for EME, CW expansion
903.1 Alternate calling frequency
903.0-906.0 Digital communications
906-909 FM repeater inputs
909-915 ATV
915-918 Digital communications
918-921 FM repeater outputs
921-927 ATV
927-928 FM simplex and links

Note: The 902 MHz band plan was adopted by the ARRL Board of Directors in July 1989

23 Centimeters (1240 - 1300 MHz)

23 Centimeters (1240 - 1300 MHz)
MHz Usage
1240-1246 ATV #1
1246-1248 Narrow-bandwidth FM point-to-point links and digital, duplex with 1258-1260.
1248-1258 Digital Communications
1252-1258 ATV #2
1258-1260 Narrow-bandwidth FM point-to-point links digital, duplexed with 1246-1252
1260-1270 Satellite uplinks, reference WARC '79
1260-1270 Wide-bandwidth experimental, simplex ATV
1270-1276 Repeater inputs, FM and linear, paired with 1282-1288, 239 pairs every 25 kHz, e.g. 1270.025, .050, etc.
1271-1283 Non-coordinated test pair
1276-1282 ATV #3
1282-1288 Repeater outputs, paired with 1270-1276
1288-1294 Wide-bandwidth experimental, simplex ATV
1294-1295 Narrow-bandwidth FM simplex services, 25-kHz channels
1294.5 National FM simplex calling frequency
1295-1297 Narrow bandwidth weak-signal communications (no FM)
1295.0-1295.8 SSTV, FAX, ACSSB, experimental
1295.8-1296.0 Reserved for EME, CW expansion
1296.00-1296.05 EME-exclusive
1296.07-1296.08 CW beacons
1296.1 CW, SSB calling frequency
1296.4-1296.6 Crossband linear translator input
1296.6-1296.8 Crossband linear translator output
1296.8-1297.0 Experimental beacons (exclusive)
1297-1300 Digital Communications

2300 - 2310 MHz and 2390 - 2450 MHz

2300 - 2310 MHz and 2390 - 2450 MHz
MHz Usage
2300.0-2303.0 High-rate data
2303.0-2303.5 Packet
2303.5-2303.8 TTY packet
2303.9-2303.9 Packet, TTY, CW, EME
2303.9-2304.1 CW, EME
2304.1 Calling frequency
2304.1-2304.2 CW, EME, SSB
2304.2-2304.3 SSB, SSTV, FAX, Packet AM, Amtor
2304.30-2304.32 Propagation beacon network
2304.32-2304.40 General propagation beacons
2304.4-2304.5 SSB, SSTV, ACSSB, FAX, Packet AM, Amtor experimental
2304.5-2304.7 Crossband linear translator input
2304.7-2304.9 Crossband linear translator output
2304.9-2305.0 Experimental beacons
2305.0-2305.2 FM simplex (25 kHz spacing)
2305.20 FM simplex calling frequency
2305.2-2306.0 FM simplex (25 kHz spacing)
2306.0-2309.0 FM Repeaters (25 kHz) input
2309.0-2310.0 Control and auxiliary links
2390.0-2396.0 Fast-scan TV
2396.0-2399.0 High-rate data
2399.0-2399.5 Packet
2399.5-2400.0 Control and auxiliary links
2400.0-2403.0 Satellite
2403.0-2408.0 Satellite high-rate data
2408.0-2410.0 Satellite
2410.0-2413.0 FM repeaters (25 kHz) output
2413.0-2418.0 High-rate data
2418.0-2430.0 Fast-scan TV
2430.0-2433.0 Satellite
2433.0-2438.0 Satellite high-rate data
2438.0-2450.0 WB FM, FSTV, FMTV, SS experimental

Note: The 2300 MHz band plan was adopted by the ARRL Board of Directors in January 1991

Note: The following band plans were adopted by the ARRL Board of Directors in July 1988

3300 - 3500 MHz

3300 - 3500 MHz
MHz Usage
3456.3-3456.4 Propagation beacons

5650 - 5925 MHz

5650 - 5925 MHz
MHz Usage
5760.3-5760.4 Propagation beacons

10.00 - 10.50 GHz

10.00 - 10.50 GHz
GHz Usage
10.368 Narrow band calling frequency 10.3683-10.3684 Propagation beacons
10.3640 Calling frequency

Above 10.50 GHz:*

All modes and licensees (except Novices) are authorized on the following bands:

24.0-24.25 GHz
47.0-47.2 GHz
76-81.0 GHz
122.25-123 GHz
134-141 GHz
241.0-250.0 GHz
All above 275 GHz

  • US amateurs must check Sections 97.301, 97.303, 97.305 and 97.307 for sharing requirements before operating.

** CAUTION:** Usage of these frequencies requires a valid Amateur Radio License. See F.C.C Rules & Regulations Part 97.


Family Radio Service (FRS)

Family Radio Service (FRS)
Ch MHz
1 462.5625
2 462.5875
3 462.6125
4 462.6375
5 462.6625
6 462.6875
7 462.7125
8 467.5625
9 467.5875
10 467.6125
11 467.6375
12 467.6625
13 467.6875
14 467.7125

Source: http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/personal/family/data/bandplan.html


General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS)

General Mobile Radio Service (GMRS)
Station Type MHz
mobile station or small base station operating in the simplex mode (1) 462.5625 (2)
462.5875 (2)
462.6125 (2)
462.6375 (2)
462.6625 (2)
462.6875 (2)
462.7125 (2)
base station, mobile relay station, fixed station or mobile station 462.5500
462.5750
462.6000
462.6250
462.6500
462.6750
462.7000
462.7250
mobile station, control station or fixed station in a duplex system 467.5500
467.5750
467.6000
467.6250
467.6500
467.6750
467.7000
467.7250

(1) Any mobile station or small base station in a GMRS system operating in the simplex mode may transmit voice type emissions with no more than 5 watts ERP.

(2) These channels are shared with the Family Radio Service. Any mobile station in a GMRS system may transmit on the 467.675 MHz channel to communicate through a mobile relay station transmitting on the 462.675 MHz channel.

Source: http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?job=service_bandplan&id=general_mobile


Citizens Band (CB)

Citizens Band (CB)
Bandplan
Band 26.965-27.405 MHz

Citizens Band (CB)
Ch MHz Ch MHz
01 26.965 21 27.215
02 26.975 22 27.225
03 26.985 23 27.255
04 27.005 24 27.235
05 27.015 25 27.245
06 27.025 26 27.265
07 27.035 27 27.275
08 27.055 28 27.285
09 27.065 29 27.295
10 27.075 30 27.305
11 27.085 31 27.315
12 27.105 32 27.325
13 27.115 33 27.335
14 27.125 34 27.345
15 27.135 35 27.355
16 27.155 36 27.365
17 27.165 37 27.375
18 27.175 38 27.385
19 27.185 39 27.395
20 27.205 40 27.405

Source: http://www.cobra.com/index.php?page=corporate/faqdetail&id=1&faq_id=177


Multi-Use Radio Service

Multi-Use Radio Service (MURS)
Ch MHz Wattage Bandwidth
1 151.820 2 watts 11.25kHz
2 151.880 2 watts 11.25kHz
3 151.940 2 watts 11.25kHz
4 154.570 2 watts 12.5kHz
5 154.600 2 watts 12.5kHz

Source: http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/personal/murs/


Itinerant Frequencies

Itinerant
Channel MHz
Red Dot 151.625
Purple Dot 151.955
Blue Dot 154.570
Green Dot 154.600
Itinerant 158.4000
Yellow Dot 464.550
Brown Dot 464.500
White Dot (GMRS) 462.575
Black Dot (GMRS) 462.625
Orange Dot (GMRS) 462.675
"J" Dot 467.7625
"K" Dot 467.8125
Silver Star 467.850
Gold Star 467.875
Red Star 467.900
Blue Star 467.925
J Dot 467.7625
K Dot 467.8125
Itinerant 27.4900
Itinerant 27.5300
Itinerant 35.0200
Itinerant 35.0400
Itinerant 42.9800
Itinerant 43.0400
Itinerant 151.5050
Itinerant 158.4000
Itinerant 451.8000
Itinerant 456.8000
Itinerant 457.5250
Itinerant 457.5500
Itinerant 457.5750
Itinerant 457.6000
Itinerant 467.7500
Itinerant 467.7750
Itinerant 467.8000
Itinerant 467.8250
Itinerant 467.8500
Itinerant 467.8700
Itinerant 467.9000
Itinerant 467.9250
Itinerant 469.5000
Itinerant 469.5500
Itinerant 527.5100

LoJack

LoJack
Description MHz Tone
Stolen Vehicle Recovery System (SVRS) 173.0750 CSQ

Marine On Board Ship Communications

Marine On Board Communications
Ch MHz
1 457.525
2 457.550
3 457.575
4 457.600
5 467.525
6 467.550
7 467.575
8 467.675
9 467.750
10 467.775
11 467.800
12 467.825

National Law Enforcement Channels (NLEC)

National Law Enforcement Channels (NLEC)
MHz
155.4750
155.4875

NWS - NOAA Weather Radio

National Weather Service
NOAA Weather Radio
MHz
162.400
162.425
162.450
162.475
162.500
162.525
162.550

Source - http://www.nws.noaa.gov/nwr/


U.S. Marine VHF Channels

U.S. Marine VHF Channels
Ch. Ship Transmit MHz Ship Receive MHz Use
1A 156.050 156.050 Port Operations and Commercial, VTS. Available only in New Orleans / Lower Mississippi area.
05A 156.250 156.250 Port Operations or VTS in the Houston, New Orleans and Seattle areas.
06 156.300 156.300 Intership Safety
07A 156.350 156.350 Commercial
08 156.400 156.400 Commercial (Intership only)
09 156.450 156.450 Boater Calling. Commercial and Non-Commercial.
10 156.500 156.500 Commercial
11 156.550 156.550 Commercial. VTS in selected areas.
12 156.600 156.600 Port Operations. VTS in selected areas.
13 156.650 156.650 Intership Navigation Safety (Bridge-to-bridge). Ships >20m length maintain a listening watch on this channel in US waters.
14 156.700 156.700 Port Operations. VTS in selected areas.
15 156.750 Environmental (Receive only). Used by Class C EPIRBs.
16 156.800 156.800 International Distress, Safety and Calling. Ships required to carry radio, USCG, and most coast stations maintain a listening watch on this channel.
17 156.850 156.850 State Control
18A 156.900 156.900 Commercial
19A 156.950 156.950 Commercial
20 157.000 161.600 Port Operations (duplex)
20A 157.000 157.000 Port Operations
21A 157.050 157.050 U.S. Coast Guard only
22A 157.100 157.100 Coast Guard Liaison and Maritime Safety Information Broadcasts. Broadcasts announced on channel 16.
23A 157.150 157.150 U.S. Coast Guard only
24 157.200 161.800 Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
25 157.250 161.850 Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
26 157.300 161.900 Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
27 157.350 161.950 Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
28 157.400 162.000 Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
63A 156.175 156.175 Port Operations and Commercial, VTS. Available only in New Orleans / Lower Mississippi area.
65A 156.275 156.275 Port Operations
66A 156.325 156.325 Port Operations
67 156.375 156.375 Commercial. Used for Bridge-to-bridge communications in lower Mississippi River. Intership only.
68 156.425 156.425 Non-Commercial
69 156.475 156.475 Non-Commercial
70 156.525 156.525 Digital Selective Calling (voice communications not allowed)
71 156.575 156.575 Non-Commercial
72 156.625 156.625 Non-Commercial (Intership only)
73 156.675 156.675 Port Operations
74 156.725 156.725 Port Operations
77 156.875 156.875 Port Operations (Intership only)
78A 156.925 156.925 Non-Commercial
79A 156.975 156.975 Commercial. Non-Commercial in Great Lakes only
80A 157.025 157.025 Commercial. Non-Commercial in Great Lakes only
81A 157.075 157.075 U.S. Government only - Environmental protection operations.
82A 157.125 157.125 U.S. Government only
83A 157.175 157.175 U.S. Coast Guard only
84 157.225 161.825 Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
85 157.275 161.875 Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
86 157.325 161.925 Public Correspondence (Marine Operator)
AIS 1 161.975 161.975 Automatic Identification System (AIS)
AIS 2 162.025 162.025 Automatic Identification System (AIS)
88A 157.425 157.425 Commercial, Intership only.

Additional Information, Frequencies, & Charts

Frequencies are in MHz. Modulation is 16KF3E or 16KG3E.

Note that the letter "A" indicates simplex use of the ship station transmit side of an international duplex channel, and that operations are different than international operations on that channel. Some VHF transceivers are equipped with an "International - U.S." switch for that purpose. "A" channels are generally only used in the United States, and use is normally not recognized or allowed outside the U.S. The letter "B" indicates simplex use of the coast station transmit side of an international duplex channel. The U.S. does not currently use "B" channels for simplex communications in this band.

Boaters should normally use channels listed as Non-Commercial. Channel 16 is used for calling other stations or for distress alerting. Channel 13 should be used to contact a ship when there is danger of collision. All ships of length 20m or greater are required to guard VHF channel 13, in addition to VHF channel 16, when operating within U.S. territorial waters. Users may be fined by the FCC for improper use of these channels. See Marine Radio Watch Requirements for further information.

See the Federal Communications Commission's Marine VHF Radio Channels page. The FCC page does not include frequency information, but has more complete information on the use of the channels. If you notice any discrepancy between these two lists, please notify us at lim.gcsu|smmocgc#lim.gcsu|smmocgc.
Also available are International VHF Maritime Radio Channels and Frequencies, Narrowband VHF Maritime Channels and Frequencies, Radio Information for Boaters , and U.S. Coast Guard VHF Distress and Safety Coverage Charts

Source - http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/marcomms/vhf.htm/


Ship Radio Stations

VHF Channel Listing

The chart below summarizes a portion of the FCC rules — 47 CFR 80.371(c) and 80.373(f)

Ship Radio Stations - VHF Channel Listing
Type of Message Appropriate Channel(s)
DISTRESS SAFETY AND CALLING - Use this channel to get the attention of another station (calling) or in emergencies (distress and safety). 16
INTERSHIP SAFETY - Use this channel for ship-to-ship safety messages and for search and rescue messages to ships and aircraft of the Coast Guard. 6
COAST GUARD LIAISON - Use this channel to talk to the Coast Guard (but first make contact on Channel 16). 22
NONCOMMERCIAL - Working channels for voluntary boats. Messages must be about the needs of the ship. Typical uses include fishing reports, rendezvous,scheduling repairs and berthing information. Use Channels 67 and 72 only for ship-to-ship messages. 96, 679,68, 69, 718, 72, 78, 794, 804
COMMERCIAL - Working channels for working ships only. Messages must be about business or the needs of the ship. Use channels 8, 67, 72 and 88A only for ship-to-ship messages. 15, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 18, 19, 635, 677, 79, 80, 88A1
PUBLIC CORRESPONDENCE (MARINE OPERATOR) - Use these channels to call the marine operator at a public coast station. By contacting a public coast station, you can make and receive calls from telephones on shore. Except for distress calls, public coast stations usually charge for this service. 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 84, 85, 86
PORT OPERATIONS - These channels are used in directing the movement of ships in or near ports, locks or waterways. Messages must be about the operational handling movement and safety of ships. In certain major ports, Channels 11,12 and are not available for general port operations messages. Use channel 20 only for ship-to-coast messages. Channel 77 is limited to intership communications to and from pilots 15, 53, 12, 14, 20, 635, 65, 66, 73, 74, 7510,7610, 77
NAVIGATIONAL - (Also known as the bridge-to-bridge channel.) This channel is available to all ships. Messages must be about ship navigation, for example, passing or meeting other ships. You must keep your messages short. Your power output must not be more than one watt. This is also the main working channel at most locks and drawbridges. 13, 67
MARITIME CONTROL - This channel may be used to talk to ships and coast stations operated by state or local governments. Messages must pertain to regulation and control, boating activities, or assistance to ships. 17
DIGITAL SELECTIVE CALLING - Use this channel for distress and safety calling and for general purpose calling using only digital selective calling techniques. 70
WEATHER - On these channels you may receive weather broadcasts of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. These channels are only for receiving. You cannot transmit on them. Wx-1 162.55 Wx-2 162.4 Wx-3 162.475

1. Not available in the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Seaway, or the Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca and its approaches.
2. Only for use In the Great Lakes, St Lawrence Seaway, and Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca and its approaches.
3. Available only In the Houston and New Orleans areas.
4. Available only in the Great Lakes.
5. Available only In the New Orleans area.
6. Available for Intership, ship, and coast general purpose calling by noncommercial ships.
7. Available only In the Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca.
8. Available for port operations communications only within the U.S. Coast Guard designated VTS radio protection area of Seattle (Puget Sound). Normal output must not exceed 1 watt.
9. Available for navigational communications only in the Mississippi River/Southwest Pass/Gulf outlet area.
10. Available for navigation-related port operations or ship movement only. Output power limited to 1 watt.

Source: http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?job=service_bandplan&id=ship_stations


Radio Control Radio Service (R/C)

FCC rules list 80 channels in the 72.0 - 73.0 MHz and 75.4 - 76 MHz VHF ranges for R/C transmissions. You must stop such transmissions, however, if they interfere with authorized radio operations in those VHF ranges or with broadcast TV reception on channels 4 or 5.
FCC rules also list HF channels at 26.995, 27.045, 27.095, 27.145, 27.195, and 27.255 MHz that may be used to operate any kind of device including model aircraft and surface craft devices. R/C channels are not afforded any protection from interference due to the operation of fixed and mobile stations in other services assigned to the same or adjacent frequencies.

Radio Control Radio Service (R/C)
Ch. MHz Usage
50 72.0 - 73.0 model aircraft devices
30 75.4 - 76.0 model surface craft devices*
  • Any small imitation of a boat, car or vehicle for carrying people or objects, except aircraft.

Source: http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?job=service_bandplan&id=radio_control


Radio Control Radio Service (R/C) Channels

27 MHz R/C Frequencies

The following channels may be used to operate any kind of device (any object or apparatus, except an R/C transmitter), including a model aircraft device (any small imitation of an aircraft) or a model surface craft device (any small imitation of a boat, car or vehicle for carrying people or objects, except aircraft)

27 MHz R/C Frequencies
Ch. MHz Flag Color Usage
Restrictions
1 26.995 Brown none
2 27.045 Red none
3 27.095 Orange none
4 27.145 Yellow none
5 27.195 Green none
6 27.255 Blue Shared w/ CB
Ch 23 Radios

50 MHz R/C Amateur Radio Frequencies

Amateur Radio Operator License Required
Flag Color: Black Streamer plus Channel Number

50 MHz
Amateur Radio
R/C Frequencies
Ch. MHz
00 50.800
01 50.820
02 50.840
03 50.860
04 50.880
05 50.900
06 50.920
07 50.940
08 50.960
09 50.980

CAUTION: Usage of these frequencies requires a valid Amateur Radio License. See F.C.C Rules & Regulations Part 97.


53 MHz R/C Amateur Radio Frequencies

Amateur Radio Operator License Required

53 MHz
Amateur Radio
R/C Frequencies
MHz Flag Color
53.1 Black-Brown
53.2 Black-Red
53.3 Black-Orange
53.4 Black-Yellow
53.5 Black-Green
53.6 Black-Blue
53.7 Black-Violet
53.8 Black-Gray

CAUTION: Usage of these frequencies requires a valid Amateur Radio License. See F.C.C Rules & Regulations Part 97.


72 MHz R/C Frequencies

The following channels may only be used to operate a model aircraft device.
Flag Color: White Streamer & Channel Number

72 MHz Frequency Band

72MHz R/C Frequencies
Ch. MHz Ch. MHz Ch. MHz Ch. MHz Ch. MHz
11 72.010 21 72.210 31 72.410 41 72.610 51 72.810
12 72.030 22 72.230 32 72.430 42 72.630 52 72.830
13 72.050 23 72.250 33 72.450 43 72.650 53 72.850
14 72.070 24 72.270 34 72.470 44 72.670 54 72.870
15 72.090 25 72.290 35 72.490 45 72.690 55 72.890
16 72.110 26 72.310 36 72.510 46 72.710 56 72.910
17 72.130 27 72.330 37 72.530 47 72.730 57 72.930
18 72.150 28 72.350 38 72.550 48 72.750 58 72.950
19 72.170 29 72.370 39 72.570 49 72.770 59 72.970
20 72.190 30 72.390 40 72.590 50 72.790 60 72.990

75 MHz R/C Frequencies

The following channels may only be used to operate a model surface craft devices.
Flag Color: Red Streamer & Channel Number

75 MHz R/C Frequencies
Ch. MHz Ch. MHz Ch. MHz
61 75.410 71 75.610 81 75.810
62 75.430 72 75.630 82 75.830
63 75.450 73 75.650 83 75.850
64 75.470 74 75.670 84 75.870
65 75.490 75 75.690 85 75.890
66 75.510 76 75.710 86 75.910
67 75.530 77 75.730 87 75.930
68 75.550 78 75.750 88 75.950
69 75.570 79 75.770 89 75.970
70 75.590 80 75.790 90 75.990

Personal Locator Beacon (PLB)

PLBs transmit distress signals on 406 MHz which is an internationally recognized distress frequency to the COSPAS-SARSAT satellite system. This system is an international program to which 36 nations belong. In the United States the 406 MHz signal is monitored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center (AFRCC). Once a signal is received, the satellites can "fix" on the signal using a Doppler Shift location method, or, when a PLB is hooked up to a GPS, the GPS coordinates can be instantly transmitted without waiting for an orbiting satellite. The signal is then relayed to a Local User Terminal (LUT). These small satellite tracking stations are located all over the world and provide the link between the satellites and the Mission Control Center (MCC), which in the USA is NOAA. This signal is then passed on to the Air Force to begin the Search and Rescue procedures.
Each PLB is equipped with a unique identifying code which is a 15 digit alpha-numeric code. This code is transmitted in the electronic burst to the satellites and is linked to a computer database maintained by NOAA to provide your name, address, phone number and any pertinent information such as medical problems, to Search and Rescue personnel.

Personal Locator Beacon (PLB)
MHz
406.00

Source: http://wireless.fcc.gov/services/index.htm?job=service_home&id=personal_locator


Satellite Radio

Satellite Radio
Service MHz
XM 2,332.50 - 2,345.00
Sirius 2,320.00 - 2,332.50

US AM Clear Channel Stations (Class A)

US AM Clear Channel Stations
KHz Call City & State KHz Call City & State
540 CBK Regina, Saskatchewan 1000 WMVP Chicago, Illinois
540 CBT Grand Falls, Newfoundland
and Labrador
1010 CBR Calgary, Alberta
540 XEWA San Luis Potosí, San Luis Potosí 1010 CFRB Toronto, Ontario
640 CBN St. John's, Newfoundland
and Labrador
1020 KDKA Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
640 KFI Los Angeles, California 1020 KAXX Eagle River, Alaska
640 KYUK Bethel, Alaska 1030 WBZ Boston, Massachusetts
650 WSM Nashville, Tennessee 1040 WHO Des Moines, Iowa
650 KENI Anchorage, Alaska 1050 XEG Monterrey, Nuevo León
660 WFAN New York, New York 1060 KYW Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
660 KFAR Fairbanks, Alaska 1060 XEEP Mexico City, D.F.
670 WSCR Chicago, Illinois 1070 KNX Los Angeles, California
670 KDLG Dillingham, Alaska 1080 WTIC Hartford, Connecticut
680 KNBR San Francisco, California 1080 KRLD Dallas, Texas
680 KBRW Barrow, Alaska 1080 KUDO Anchorage, Alaska
690 CINF Montreal, Quebec 1090 KAAY Little Rock, Arkansas
690 XETRA Tijuana, Baja California 1090 WBAL Baltimore, Maryland
700 WLW Cincinnati, Ohio 1100 WTAM Cleveland, Ohio
700 KBYR Anchorage, Alaska 1110 KFAB Omaha, Nebraska
710 KIRO Seattle, Washington 1110 WBT Charlotte, North Carolina
710 WOR New York, New York 1120 KMOX St. Louis, Missouri
720 WGN Chicago, Illinois 1130 CKWX Vancouver, British Columbia
720 KOTZ Kotzebue, Alaska 1130 KWKH Shreveport, Louisiana
730 CKAC Montreal, Quebec 1130 WBBR New York, New York
730 XEX Mexico City, D.F. 1140 WRVA Richmond, Virginia
740 CHWO Toronto, Ontario 1140 XEMR Monterrey, Nuevo León
750 WSB Atlanta, Georgia 1160 KSL Salt Lake City, Utah
750 KFQD Anchorage, Alaska 1170 KFAQ Tulsa, Oklahoma
760 WJR Detroit, Michigan 1170 WWVA Wheeling, West Virginia
770 WABC New York, New York 1170 KJNP North Pole, Alaska
770 KCHU Valdez, Alaska 1180 WHAM Rochester, New York
780 WBBM Chicago, Illinois 1190 KEX Portland, Oregon
780 KNOM Nome, Alaska 1190 XEWK Guadalajara, Jalisco
800 XEROK Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua 1200 WOAI San Antonio, Texas
810 KGO San Francisco, California 1210 WPHT Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
810 WGY Schenectady, New York 1220 XEB Mexico City, D.F.
820 WBAP Fort Worth, Texas 1500 KSTP Saint Paul, Minnesota
820 KCBF Fairbanks, Alaska 1500 WWWT Washington, D.C.
830 WCCO Minneapolis, Minnesota 1510 KGA Spokane, Washington
840 WHAS Louisville, Kentucky 1510 WLAC Nashville, Tennessee
850 KOA Denver, Colorado 1520 KOKC Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
850 KICY Nome, Alaska 1520 WWKB Buffalo, New York
860 CJBC Toronto, Ontario 1530 KFBK Sacramento, California
870 WWL New Orleans, Louisiana 1530 WCKY Cincinnati, Ohio
880 WCBS New York, New York 1540 KXEL Waterloo, Iowa
890 WLS Chicago, Illinois 1540 ZNS-1 Nassau, Bahamas
890 KBBI Homer, Alaska 1550 CBE Windsor, Ontario
900 XEW Mexico City, D.F. 1550 XERUV Xalapa, Veracruz
940 CINW Montreal, Quebec 1560 KNZR Bakersfield, California
940 XEQ Mexico City, D.F. 1560 WQEW New York, New York
990 CBW Winnipeg, Manitoba 1570 XERF Ciudad Acuña, Coahuila
990 CBY Corner Brook, Newfoundland
and Labrador
1580 CKDO Oshawa, Ontario
1000 KOMO Seattle, Washington

802.11b Wireless LAN

802.11b
Wireless LAN
Frequencies
Ch. GHz Ch. GHz
1 2.412 8 2.447
2 2.417 9 2.452
3 2.422 10 2.457
4 2.427 11 2.462
5 2.432 12 2.467
6 2.437 13 2.472
7 2.442 14 2.484

WWV Time Signal

WWV Time Signal Frequencies
City & State MHz Time Watts
Fort Collins, CO 2.5000 WWV Time Standard 5,000
Ottawa, Ontario CA 3.3300 CHU Canada Time Standard
Fort Collins, CO 5.0000 WWV Time Standard 10,000
Ottawa, Ontario CA 7.3350 CHU Canada Time Standard
Fort Collins, CO 10.0000 WWV Time Standard 10,000
Ottawa, Ontario CA 14.6700 CHU Canada Time Standard
Fort Collins, CO 15.0000 WWV Time Standard 10,000
Fort Collins, CO 20.0000 WWV Time Standard 10,000
Fort Collins, CO 25.0000 WWV Time Standard 10,000

GPS Frequencies

GPS Frequencies
Ch. MHz Use
L1 1575.42 Mix of Navigation Message, coarse-acquisition (C/A) code and encrypted precision P(Y) code, plus the new L1C on future Block III satellites.
L2 1227.60 P(Y) code, plus the new L2C code on the Block IIR-M and newer satellites.
L3 1381.05 Used by the Nuclear Detonation (NUDET) Detection System Payload (NDS) to signal detection of nuclear detonations and other high-energy infrared events. Used to enforce nuclear test ban treaties.
L4 1379.913 Being studied for additional ionospheric correction.
L5 1176.45 Proposed for use as a civilian safety-of-life (SoL) signal (see GPS modernization). This frequency falls into an internationally protected range for aeronautical navigation, promising little or no interference under all circumstances. The first Block IIF satellite that would provide this signal is set to be launched in 2009.

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